103 People Unfriended Her, How Many Would Do the Same to Me

freshly-pressed-rectangleI came across a Huffington post about a woman who posted pictures of herself on her Facebook wall that caused a collapse in her social circle.  The headline said “When Beth Posted These Images on Facebook, 103 People Unfriended Her”.   

The headline effectively grabbed my attention, but what the story really did was zero in on the heart of one of my own deepest fears.  It cut to a deep vulnerability that even I don’t fully understand, but it’s one that has held me back from engaging as fully in life as I possibly could.  I can’t do that until I can somehow get to a place of true peace about it.

canvas-scars-e1402024284679The pictures that Beth Whaanga, the woman in the Huffington piece, posted were semi-nude images of herself featuring her scars from a double mastectomy and a hysterectomy.  They were taken by a photographer leading a project called, “Under the Red Dress”. It endeavors to share a pictorial story to inform and support anyone who has or may be affected by breast cancer.

I found the project a beautiful and amazing effort and I applaud Beth’s astonishing courage. It was those 103 friends though, that stayed with me longer than the point of her story.  They represented the maybe 103 reasons I have an issue of my own.  Like Beth, my body has been criss–crossed with several large and deep scars, not from cancer, but another serious chronic issue. I find despite my confidence in life generally, I haven’t yet been able to re-gain confidence about this new reality of my own image.

I know some of my friends might be surprised to hear this, but maybe not a few who knew me from long ago when I was more carefree in my pre-health issue, pre-pregnancy and pre-surgical body.  I received plenty of positive attention back then, and I am sure that, despite all equality efforts to move past this, I won some business benefits because of my appearance.  Looks matter.

In seeming contradiction to what I’m saying so far, I do have a full life, in large part because of those scars.  My priorities absolutely honed in on family, community, purpose(s), and I do live to serve as best as I am able, but.  But.

  •  But now there are tremendous differences in my body and there’s not much I can do about it without the resources that I might employ if I had them.
  • But now I don’t know how to dress in ways that are really about highlighting my best, and not hiding the changed stage starring scars that come through the fabric.
  • But I have no idea how many more scars will be added.
  • But I don’t want anyone to see them. Hey, when even your loved ones grimace….
  • But what if I really like someone and then….?  How many of the 103 are on my path?
  • But what if I’m not enough for someone to see past them?
  • But, what kind of person would be attracted to this? Ugh! What kind of person would be attracted to this?

Cripes, I didn’t even want to tell anyone I had them, and now that I have, it’s still safe to say that there will be no pole-dancing in my future.

Yes, I know I am not my scars.  That, on the surface of it, considering that I have been able to claim at least 4 of my 9 lives, this shouldn’t even be a factor in my world.  I’ve been told to wear my scars proudly, as the badges of (literal & figurative) survival. Truth be told, I would say the same to someone else.  So then, why aren’t I able to do that for me?  Why can I stand up for Beth, but not me?

I’m one of those people who believe that there are no real coincidences and that I was meant to see this story.  It compelled me to review myself again and honestly and directly confront the part of me that holds me back from feeling whole again.  I believe in my whole spirit, but I haven’t yet worked out how to truly infuse that into my life experience.  I know that next to that, one new step is allowing me to entertain the idea of another relationship. (Yes, girlfriends and parents, I know you think the time for a new man is overdue, but…).

In the end, I have to live with myself, and I find that hard enough in some of the ways I’ve shown.  I’m not sure if I will ever live with someone else again, but if I decide that’s for me, I’m pretty sure I’m going to have to get to that place of peace first.

So there, I’ve said it out loud. Sort of.  Maybe this note is about just getting to honest acknowledgement that this is real for me and the real me.  Perhaps the scars are a step in my overall purpose. Maybe someday I will be as brave as Beth – not for  pictures, but in her confident acceptance.  I don’t have the answers yet, but I hope to one day.  This is a story written mid-struggle.  For now, the only thing about life that I’m certain about is it’s uncertainty, – and how much I love my boy.

RL

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About Blog Woman!!!

Once in a while I can rock a thought. I simply believe in what I stand up for. I'd most like people to know that surviving the trials of mountains and monsters is more than resilience - it’s a path to your destiny. On a mostly weekly basis I throw out a grab-bag of facts, ideas or creativity; like a box of chocolates wrapped in ribbons of occasional profanity.... In other words, it's my party I can fun if I want to. So, let's talk.
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392 Responses to 103 People Unfriended Her, How Many Would Do the Same to Me

  1. Belle El-Zubab says:

    This was really moving and beautiful. I think it’s too easy to judge ourselves by the worth of our bodies as seen through our image-focused culture, and social media and selfie culture unintentionally perpetuate this notion that everyone else is so happy and perfect. I’m sure some people only want to follow others who’s lives and looks they consider “aspirational’ and avoid what they see as signs of “negativity” (thanks, Law of Attraction!). Maybe this explains the thought process of any women who might have unfollowed Beth.

    I am living with an invisible illness, so while I’m not scarred, have to deal with limitations that are difficult for people to understand, and difficult for me to accept sometimes. A book that’s helped me a lot is the Bhagavad Gita as it basically says “don’t worry about what others think or the consequences of doing the right thing: just do it” (e.g. don’t worry about what will happen if you put yourself out there romantically) and it helps me see myself not as my body, but as a thing that lives within my body.

    “These bodies come to an end;
    but that vast embodied Self
    is ageless, fathomless, eternal
    ……
    it cannot be pierced or singed.
    moistened or withered: it is vast,
    perfect and all pervading,
    calm, immovable, timeless.’

    Wishing you a lot of love xxx

    Like

    • Hello Belle. What a pleasure to receive your really wonderful and thoughtful response. I love those words of beauty. Thank you for sharing that you live with hidden illness too. It’s really something isn’t it, all that this kind of challenge brings to us? I never really thought I would have an issue with accepting a big change with my body, but here I am. I guess somewhere under it all, I thought there might be some kind of miracle. I guess the miracle will be my own acceptance, and self-forgiveness. It’s because of encouragement from people like you who help me to remember who I really am. One step closer to peace. Thank you so much, for coming by, and then sharing these beautiful thoughts. I hope I see you again soon.
      Robyn

      Like

  2. grotmanharry says:

    Reblogged this on harrygrotman and commented:
    I agree with You. Nice article.

    Like

  3. Reblogged this on thediscreetawkward's Blog and commented:
    BEAUTIFUL

    Like

  4. mcbarlow5 says:

    I too have a long deep scar down my belly from ulcer surgery. Maybe we should all just post pics of our scars and put it out there. Great post!

    Like

    • Well, this put a smile on my face. Not because you have the scar, but just the visual of a bunch of us lining up for a group scar photo. Maybe one day we’ll just do that, but for now, I’ll take it one smaller step at a time. 😉 Thanks for coming by, this was a great comment!

      Like

  5. Gingernut says:

    Reblogged this on GingerNut Creativity and commented:
    Amazing!

    Like

  6. gypsyprincess says:

    impressing story… wish you good luck on your journey finding your self confidence!

    Like

  7. Nadyess says:

    Great post! And I really admire your bravery for sharing your story. Thank you very much for sharing!

    Like

  8. Paro says:

    I was wondering how you feel when loved ones grimace? When someone’s body language tells you they are disgusted or feel sorry. I am in a similar situation right now and I just want to know what you tell yourself. I feel anger, do you? Beth is brave to let people see her scars.

    Like

    • Hello Paro, what a wonderful question you ask. An honest answer is that, although I know that they are likely pained by the idea that I suffered, I can’t help feeling that if they see these scars with that reaction, then someone who doesn’t know me, or has nothing invested to know me as well, would likely be more turned off. I don’t really feel anger about it. Maybe I moved past the initial anger that they are here to stay.I guess it’s more of a frustration because there is little I can do about it, but get on with the business of acceptance. Reading Beth’s story was part of what pushed me over the edge to just admit it’s all there. I don’t know that I’l have an overnight epiphany, but this is part of the trip. Thank you so much for reading my story, and I really wish you the very best in your own journey.

      Like

  9. Reblogged this on A Guitar with no Strings and commented:
    Profound truths

    Like

  10. Reblogged this on Tarek Elbakry's Blog and commented:
    Strange story!

    Like

  11. Mythoughts76 says:

    Beth is much better off knowing who her true friends are, aren’t we all? People are just afraid of reality and how it can change even their lives.

    Like

    • I agree with you, Beth is likely far better off without people who are unable to support her. There is no doubt there is a lot of fear that drives people to act or hide. Thank you for your visit and taking the time to comment here.

      Like

  12. I commend you for your honesty. I also hope in the very near future you will embrace your entire beauty, inside and out. Our body is just a vehicle to carry us from one life experience to the next. Keep it as healthy as you can, but embrace the lumps, bumps, scars and imperfections as they are: moments to learn from, challenges overcome, disease conquered, and what makes us unique. Thank you for sharing your heart in such an eloquent manner!

    Like

    • Thank you Joanne, your supportive comments are just the kinds of things we all need to hear to reinforce our will to take the next step to acceptance, and hopefully genuine peace. I really appreciate that you came by, and that you gave some of your time to comment.
      Robyn

      Like

  13. iiadoremyink says:

    Wow! Society is so critical and judge mental about people. The people who should be honored are not and those that shouldn’t are. So many people have scars internally and externally but the lack of compassion from society makes others that are going through trials hide from telling there testimony which can always help someone else. I applaud her because she has freed a lot of Silent readers who may or may not say so. I know in scripture Jesus said that he prayed for our faith not to fail us and that when we have passed the test and our obedience is full reach back and get the brethren. Each one reach one is what my Apostle always says. Be a light and blessing to someone.

    God bless you for sharing

    Xoxo

    iiAdoreMyInk

    Like

    • Thank you very much for your visit, and for your very kind and thoughtful comments. Yes, hopefully some day soon we will all be truly compassionate to each other. Thanks again,and take care.

      Like

  14. PorterGirl says:

    Those are 103 people nobody needs in their life.

    Like

  15. What a wonderful story of courage. As I see it, you’re both beautiful, inside and out. As for those so called friends, that deleted her… Shame on you all! They obviously were not friends to begin with. God bless you both!

    Like

  16. Working in healthcare I have seen many scars and more. I see many naked after meeting just minutes before. Only the person matters to me. Flaws are only flaws if we look to others who tell us they are better than us.
    We are who we are and not 103 “friends” should decide if you look ‘good’. Only You decide that. But it is probably more than that. I think the 103 people who unfriended her have deep fears that they are not really familiar with. They judge because they don’t want to be confronted with the person behind the facebook friend. Worse, she makes them think. What if this happens to me? Is she bad luck maybe?
    Same with getting old, just notice how some people just don’t like to visit a nursing home or an older family member home alone.
    And younger people getting disabled or ill who find out that love and friendship are sometimes just limited to good times?
    Still, it hurts when people judge. That is why we must love ourselves first.

    Like

    • Thank you for your visit. Your background makes an important point here because your perspective sees the more of the battle scars from living than most of us do. I agree with you that the poor reactions are more in line with fear and discomfort. I know what you mean when you say we have to love ourselves first. I didn’t realize that I was missing a part of that until recently. These conversations are a wonderful help for me to get on with healing that in me. Thank you for your kind words.

      Like

  17. Reblogged this on Dish with Mish and commented:
    What a beautiful story of courage. I couldn’t help but get emotional when reading this. Some people have no compassion and shame on them, for wearing the ignorance, on their sleeves!

    Like

  18. tenaciousz says:

    To me, you are the sum of your scars, visible and invisible, mental an physical. Every scar you have tells a tiny part of your story and made you who you are. A chronic illness is part of you, and tells part of your story. Beth still looks beautiful regardless of her scars and you do too. I don’t need to see you to know that.
    Anybody that says otherwise, is talking about a reflection of themselves, and their total lack of confidence in what they have.
    Hats off to both of you.

    Like

  19. darkmuze says:

    I loved your story and your thoughts behind it. I think we can say that
    even when we don’t have scars, some of us still have issues liking
    who we are as a person and want to be accepted for who and what
    we are. Self esteem issues don’t come so easily, and somehow we have
    to learn to accept ourselves before others can, and if the “others”
    can’t, then they probably weren’t to be in our lives in the first place.
    Now, about the people unfriended this woman, well, in my personal
    opinion, I looked at the link you shared “under the red dress,” and
    I will honestly say FB is not a place to share pictures like that, and people
    may not want to see them, because it may be disturbing to some,
    and for the fact that nudity is involved. I think people should keep some
    things private..OK, you have scars, YOU have overcome a lot, GOOD
    FOR YOU, but to bring people on your friendslist into a very personal
    place like showing nude pictures, in my belief is just NOT right.
    You can be proud without going to the extreme, and in my opinion,
    people on FB put too much out there, and have seen some extreme
    things. Also, for that person to just share these pictures to me
    is disrespectful, saying LOOK at me whether you want to or not.
    You may not agree with what I am saying, and that is fine,
    because we all have opinions:).

    Like

    • Hello, and thank you for your visit and thoughtful comments. I definitely do not have a problem with people having a different opinion from me. My view is that as much as I’m not happy that people unfriended Beth, we can’t know what the reactions were really about. We also don’t really know how the pictures were shared on the Facebook account, but I think you can disagree with a post going up by choosing to hide the post on your own newsfeed or unfollow altogether, but to completely delete her from a friend’s list seems unduly harsh. I’d also imagine they were already aware of Beth’s health issues prior to that. So, it seems the reaction is quite jarring to me. But, as well, I agree with all who say she is better off without 103 unsupportive bodies in her world.
      We will overcome, I think.
      Thanks again.

      Like

  20. C.M. Crabtree says:

    I thought this blog was amazing. Perhaps it’s good to weed out the weak friends to ensure a stronger circle of friends. It’s hard to see people go but if they are going to leave over something like that….good riddance! You are an amazing person, I’m sure you’ll find that even if a few bad apples leave that more good people will not only take their place but add to your life so much more.

    Like

    • Thank you so much C.M. What a pleasure to read your opening line! You are right, I think. As painful as it is, weeding out weakness is the best thing in the end. I went through something similar about 15 years ago, and it was shocking, but today I know I would never have made it this far with the weight of the misery I had to let go of then. I suppose even knowing that, I am a little gun shy of experiencing it again! Stories like Beth’s help me to see, there is a way to move past fears that hold people back. Again, thank you for your visit and wonderful comment.

      Like

  21. stilahuman says:

    Great blog, captivating because it is true to heart.

    Like

  22. beautifully written post, many well said thoughts! Inspiring and brave to have written.I can’t believe people would ‘defriend’ someone because of this! As someone said above, good riddance, we are all beautiful inside, and sometimes our scars or challenges make us stronger. Thank you for sharing!

    Like

  23. emilylewis90 says:

    I always remember after her surgery my nan would cover her body and her bright and colourful blouses she wouldnt wear anymore. It always saddened me that she couldnt be herself anymore, but I would like to think with more honest and open people like yourself then confidence amongst people will grow.

    Like

    • Oh Emily, thank you so much for sharing your story. I so understand how your nan’s feelings. I also understand how people telling their own stories is a big help. If I hadn’t read Beth’s story, I would probably still be denying to myself that I was not really happy with my new body, and hiding even more. It is one story, and one day at a time, but hopefully it won’t take too long for everybody to be okay with what is. Thank you again for your visit.
      Robyn

      Like

  24. Thank you for this beautiful blog! I admire you for sharing this with us..!

    Like

  25. bluerosegirl08 says:

    I’m disabled. Because of this I’ve had to live with lots of scarring starting at the age of four. I’ve never had a “normal” body , one that people think of as pretty or attractive at first blush. I face some of the same doubts you do like “is there any way I can dress so a person’s first thought is ‘she looks really pretty’ and not’ she’s really pretty….for a girl in a wheelchair’?” I think strength can come from solidarity. If everybody who has scars and other “disfigurements” flooded the internet with pictures proclaiming things like “I am beautiful too” “My normal exists” “Life happens” etc. maybe we could change the perception of beauty.

    Like

    • How nice that you read my story and came to talk. I saw your picture and I did see the wheelchair, but what I saw first was the beautiful smile that lights up your face. I love your idea about flooding the internet! That could be quite the project!! It seems that for any doubts about how you may be perceived, you have an amazing inner strength too. I’m going to continue to work on mine and maybe someday I can be a part of some kind of ‘Life Happens” project. Thanks again, I really enjoyed that you shared your own story.
      Robyn

      Like

  26. About the woman who posted the pictures…. I salute her.
    She may have been ungrounded by 103 people but she was not shy to show her scars.
    It was a statement ‘This is me. I am proud of myself.’
    The same thing for you, even if you have scars do not think less of your self or doubt your self.
    Show them off

    Like

    • Thank you so much, for coming by and for sharing your supportive statements. It is really encouraging to hear from people who are not afraid of these kinds of imperfections. Really kind of you to say so.

      Like

  27. segmation says:

    All depends on what is said. If someone discusses the same topics all the time, I unfriend them!

    Like

  28. Victoria says:

    Beautiful story of a brave woman! How many women could do what she did and let the world see her scars?

    Like

    • How many women would indeed! I know I sure can’t, but what Beth did for me was to help me move past hiding my own feelings from myself and start on the next steps to her level of acceptance. She really is heroic in my eyes. Thank you for coming by and commenting.

      Like

  29. qrparker says:

    If I posted semi-nude pictures I’d probably lose most of my facebook friends. Not because I have any scars, but just because I’m kind of fat and ugly.

    Like

    • OK, my first reaction was a giggle, so I really hope this comment was said in a completely joking manner. Otherwise, I’d say you have basically the same issue as me and could use a little help with accepting what is. Thanks for coming by, and for commenting!

      Like

  30. Corina says:

    I don’t even know how to start. Maybe saying Hello and that I wish you to find the strength within you to be confident and always remember that each and everyone of us is special for what it is on the inside. The inner beauty comes out and glows, covering the exterior which may not be perfect according to “Cosmopolitan” or “Playboy” standards. A truly wonderful person will love you for your warm heart and soul, for your jokes and laughter and for your kind thoughts.
    I am happy you shared also the story of Beth and her mastectomy photos.

    Like

  31. Vikera says:

    Scars – on your body or in you heart – are proof that YOU LIVED despite being ravaged!

    It’s hard when what on the outside doesn’t match what’s on the inside, but if you had to choose one or the other, I’m sure you’d choose the inside, which is where the treasure lies, my friend!

    Stay strong! You survived!

    Like

  32. I have a scar across my throat/neck from two thyroid cancer operations. It speaks of my life and my survival and my resilience. It would be wrong to hide it in shame. Thank god for people like this woman, and also to anyone who wears their life story on their body.

    Like

    • And thank God for people like you, who have reached that point of awareness. These are the stories and examples that we need to add to our baskets of courage and acceptance. Thank you for sharing your story here.
      Robyn

      Like

  33. Rashi says:

    Beautiful work
    I have done an interventional study on body image disorders that bring out the stated fact
    This is a troubling emerging problem in today’s youth

    Like

  34. There’s too much emphasis on looks in this country. Why are scars considered so unattractive? Especially pregnancy scars. You just brought life into the world and people are concerned with how their body looks afterwards. Nothing in life lasts and it seems looks are one of the first things to go.

    Like

    • Hi Jennifer, you are bringing up the very heart of the issue there. I so hope that with these continuing discussions we can teach our babies what beauty is really about – especially for things like the stunning ability that is childbirth. Thanks very much for your visit!
      Robyn

      Like

  35. Even if one does not have scars, because our culture is so conscientious about “perfect beauty” (what even is that) people are so afraid to show themselves, so afraid instead of confident. And here you are, with actual scars, a woman who clearly does have a deep beauty and is so much more than the scars. What excuse does anyone else have to hide themselves?

    Thank you for your post, and I wish you all the luck in your steps towards confidence and seeing your own beauty.

    Like

    • Hello Rii, I am so touched by your incredibly kind words. I thank you so much for that kindness, and for giving your time to visit my post. I also hope your question about hiding becomes irrelevant soon enough if we keep asking it.
      Robyn

      Like

  36. If someone stops being your friend after finding out about your pain or “imperfections,” you haven’t actually lost a friend – that person was never a friend in the first place. True friends care about your pain. You probably won’t have many true friends – not 103! – and if some of the impostor-friends drop out as they find out more about you, good riddance. Better to find out about them now, and know not to rely on them too heavily, than to look for them when you need support through a really difficult time and find them gone.

    Like

    • I couldn’t agree with you more on that point. After an initial shock, there is a realization that there wasn’t much lost except a lot of weak weight! Thanks so much for your visit and comment, I really appreciate it.

      Like

  37. lisadiakova says:

    I’m actually quite happy she lost those 103 friends. The loss is what called attention to her story and helped her connect to thousands of new people who appreciated her statement, who saw her gesture as something worthy and beautiful. This perhaps teaches us that loss can be a phenomenal thing, that sometimes we need to amputate the infected arms in order to grow wings.

    Like

  38. zosimestorm says:

    I think that in an ideal world, people won’t judge for other people’s appearances, but that will never happen. You have the stubborn headed, shallow minded people in life that aren’t willing to even look at anyone who isn’t perfect, and think that that beauty is worth any price. Most people have plastic surgery and all sorts, but I feel that being natural is the best. If you have scars, to hell with them. No one cares, and if they do, that is just one of the their many shallow minded traits. To be honest, if anyone shuns you for that, they aren’t worth knowing. I hope everyone gives you their support and that you realise how much courage you have just to even talk about this topic, when some people hide it because they are afraid of rejection. Well done and I wish you well for the future

    Like

    • Thank you so much for your encouraging words. I do think it’s important to remain cognizant that not everyone is deeper than an ice cube, but that there are so many more people that are true and caring. It is so good for those of us struggling for a while to hear thoughts like yours to help us along the way. Thank you for that and the time you gave to say so.

      Like

  39. Kayla Marie says:

    I loved this and I almost wrote something touching on this topic, I’ve never been through it but it’s something people should read! Nobody should turn their back on someone for going through something and posting pictures of their battle wounds

    Like

    • Hello Kayla, thank you so much for your wonderful comment. I think you should write about this. The more often this conversation is brought up, the faster we can help people learn how many more wonderful people are out there than the ones we fear are. Thank you for your visit.

      Like

  40. Raymore says:

    very inspiring and a great story of triumph over obstacles…

    Like

  41. Those 103 people don’t get it. Our scars make a large part of who we are. The circumstances that brought about those scars changed our lives. If someone doesn’t understand that Beth is reaching a larger audience, beyond their shallow, narrow minded existence, that is their problem. Were I in her position, yes, it would hurt deeply that 103 people whom I considered friends, chose to end our friendship over pictures they couldn’t handle. I applaud you for talking about your own experience. I hope you find peace, and are able to find the confidence you are searching for. Thank you for sharing, and please continue to share this journey. Many people have much to learn from you.

    Like

    • Thank you very much for your kindness and encouragement. I’ve been saying that these comments are so wonderful, but they are also so meaningful to those of us who know those 103 types are out there, but that there are far more 1leftofcenter types. Thank you for that, and for your visit. Cheers to you.

      Like

  42. I believe human beings are on the planet not to share our perfections but our imperfections. Across the planet, across cultures the term beauty and what is beautiful are defined differently. It is unfortunate in America (much in part due to the Media and what generates money) the human form has been literally blown out of proportion. When people with fairly obvious surgical enhancements (not due to any medical need: i.e. mastectomy…) grace the covers of health magazines we’ve turned a lopsided corner. I don’t have to meet you in person to know you are a true beauty. Keep well, stay sane and be happy.
    AnnMarie
    newbie blogger who spent her first twenty-five years of life worrying how she looked and trying to hide her weight…50 is so much cooler 🙂

    Like

    • Hello AnnMarie, I am impressed with your belief, and I am overwhelmed with your kind compliment, and well wishes. I have said that these are the comments that do help people struggling with an issue keep sane. It is such a pleasure to hear from decent people. Thank you so much for your comments and your visit. You’ve really given me a big smile…. and 50 IS awesome. Good luck with your blogging, I’m almost at a year and it has been a very fun and worthwhile adventure. Cheers to you.

      Like

  43. JW Sayre says:

    I think “Facebook Friends” sums it up…those 103 people weren’t friends. Friends can see each other naked (emotionally and physically) and still be friends. FB is fun and all, but c’mon folks, we’re not all friends. Great post-thanks for sharing. -JW

    Like

  44. I just found your blog tonight and I’m so glad I did.. I have been sick for 20 years and it has changed my appearance in many ways and not for the better.. As for Beth? Kuddo’s to her for putting it out there and staying true to herself. As for the 103? They don’t matter….As for yourself, you are beautiful as you are and anyone who would “walk away’ from you based on outward appearances is not someone you want to have in your life anyway. Ive learned a lot over my 20 yrs of illness and the biggest one is if you’re going to judge my book by its cover and not take the time to read some of the pages then you are not someone I want in my life. I’ve learned to accept me as I am and love myself as I am… All the best to you!

    Like

    • Thank you so much for this. What a beautiful, kind and thoughtful comment for anyone to receive. Of course coming from someone dealing with illness for 20 years, I would say you’ve probably learned a lot about what is valuable in life. I’m so glad to hear you are not another one with this hurdle. Thank you again for your visit, and I wish you all the very best in health. Take good care, I hope to see you again soon.

      Like

  45. It’s hard for me to fathom un-friending anyone in this situation. I couldn’t bare my body the way she did, but I also don’t feel deserving of the “privilege” so to speak to do so. If my body was mutilated after eradicating cancer, I might put it out there as a symbol of my bravery. But, to put my body out there after countless pounds lost and gained, well, there’s some self-loathing that gets in the way.

    Like

    • Hello Margo, I couldn’t put my body out there like that even before I had scars, so I know what you mean about the significance of sharing badges of honour, so to speak. I’m not sure what kinds of friends they had to have been, but as a reaction to the circumstances, they couldn’t have been much. Thanks so much for coming by and sharing your time and thoughts.

      Like

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