Remember That Thing Called, ‘The Canadian Way’? Yeah, Not So Much

When it comes to the past, the quotation, “History is written by the victors” is supposed to be the bottom-line. But the truth is, history is more often true only until it’s uncovered. Unfortunately, often such revelations induce intense reactions. Especially toward people who now have a magnified voice to speak about their place in that history. We’ve seen plenty of this recently with Indigenous perspectives brought to light far more widely in Canada.

When I was a little girl, I remember how proud I’d feel when tested on Canadian history. I’d swell with pride the most at knowing who our heroes were.

Robyn, who was our first Prime Minister? “John A. MacDonald, ma’am”!

And what did he do for Canada? “He built the railroad, ma’am and he built our great nation”.  Good girl. Oh yes, a proud little brown girl in braids staunchly saluting the man and country.

Then my world shifted, with a decidedly brutish thud. I’d be well into adulthood when I learned who J.A. MacDonald the man, really was and what this first Prime Minister of Canada did to my grandparents for 6 generations and counting.

John A. MacDonald – venerated on Canadian money, statues and plaques across the country was a depraved, racist drunk who did his level Prime Ministerial best to wipe out my grandparents, my heritage, my culture, my status of equal standing even within the Indigenous community, and my God-given inheritance rights of our lands and resources.

That’s some ‘uncovered history’ and I suppose I went through stages of grief following – full disbelief at the absolute betrayal – by MacDonald, my teachers, the entire country’s standings. Although, I have yet to truly get past that anger stage. Not because I haven’t yet processed the often requested, “taking into account the mentalities of those days”, but because most of his policies are still being enforced to this day, by the more than willing.

The number of inequities and prejudices still leveled at the Indigenous in Canada are documented daily – news stories, opinion pieces, every social media platform, and via self-appointed trustees of the Canadian taxpayer, (who completely ignore that the Indigenous majority pay taxes – & that irony).

So, Indigenous history aside for the moment, it’s not very surprising to see what happens when more truth-hammers come down onto mythic Canadians of account. I understand that sense of shock, even for the side that hasn’t suffered the injustices their heroes perpetrated.

Canada maple leaf flowers

What is surprising, given the monumental (no pun intended) work to promote it is, the lack of that famous ‘Canadian fairness/niceness’. Because not only is there justified, understandable shock, the amount of immediate outright denial and shutdown is stunningly disappointing.

Too often, every excuse to pardon the atrocities and buff the edges of inhumanity are trotted out. Regardless of credible citation provided, every rationalization possible is provoked. Case closed. Nothing to see here, folks.  Oh and, “We’re not racists”!

Although, also often ignored are the denials especially loudly voiced if the research is supplied or written by an Indigenous person. That right there is proof of merely ‘biased opinion’. Only the ‘white science/history’ need speak to history, thank you very much.

When I received that J.A. MacDonald reality check, the ground shifted and my world changed forever. I learned that not only what I’d been taught was a lie – especially the parts that said my ancestors and I were from an empty, useless abyss, but I was to see how much the world around me was still promoting that abysmal record of inaccuracy.

It’s scary as hell and ugly. It’s frustrating and infuriating, but like most pasts of bad behavior – it can be changed for the better. However, it can’t be changed, cured or healed, nor grow into something genuinely good for all, until it is really seen.

It’s time to own up to the fact that Canadian atrocities are real, no matter how poorly that reflects on Canadians. The reflection can’t be clean until we get clear. We can’t hide our heads in the sand and allow professional or neighbourhood deflectors to speak for us anymore.

We can’t be called decent until we behave with decency. We can’t let fears of losing face for not being good people over-ride actually acting in decency. When we know better, we do better. Well, right now we know enough. Take responsibility for the price of the benefits still received from that history.

Opportunities present daily, requiring little effort. It’s as simple as reading the Truth and Reconciliation Report and its 94 calls to action. Act on the ones you can.

Addressing history isn’t about changing it. Homages to Canadian atrocities belong in museums from where we can learn. Let’s place pride in seeing, cleaning and dressing the wounds. Place pride in those who build honourably and for those who overcome atrocities. In honesty; why shouldn’t that be the ‘Canadian way’? Honestly.

RL

 

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About Blog Woman!!!

Once in a while I can rock a thought. I simply believe in what I stand up for. I'd most like people to know that surviving the trials of mountains and monsters is more than resilience - it’s a path to your destiny. On a mostly weekly basis I throw out a grab-bag of facts, ideas or creativity; like a box of chocolates wrapped in ribbons of occasional profanity.... In other words, it's my party I can fun if I want to. So, let's talk.
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9 Responses to Remember That Thing Called, ‘The Canadian Way’? Yeah, Not So Much

  1. Powerful post! My dad somehow was able to hold both his hurt at how he and out extended family was treated, and a deep love of country. He idealized Abe Lincoln. When I began to learn about what had happened I lost all of that affection for country. That said, I also hope for healing to come, although as the US heads back towards the 1840’s, healing seems increasingly far away.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, so much, Michael. It’s really something isn’t it, not only is it a major personal journey to come out of hiding, but then to really feel the sense of disconnection and disconcerting result of feeling like an alien in your own home…

      I can only imagine what it’s like for everyone in the U.S. right now. Even with my own odd sense of discomfort here, it still feels somewhat safer than your side of that border. I don’t even care to visit, I’m afraid. I hope it won’t be long before that pustule of malevolence wrapped in barely disguising ‘we care’ bubble wrap is excised far sooner than later.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oddly, some 54% of people who identify as white still support the government. The numbers for minorities is my ch, much smaller. It seems pollsters don’t ask Indigenous people. Yes, it is a scary time, again. The president makes Harper seem moderate, and that is deeply frightening. And yes, may it pass soon.

        An elder phoned a couple of nights ago. She is much more a target as she looks Native, and again was feeling targeted. People seem to be getting more mean.

        Like

  2. calmkate says:

    powerful post!
    I feel for all First Nation people, Australian history of denial, slaughter and abuse continues to this day .. all I can do is support as able and call out each and every untruth I hear. Have Canadian friends living here and wished them ‘happy Canada day’ and mentioned that it’s a shame this celebration doesn’t recognise and honour the original land owners … none made reference to this …
    May your hearts and souls heal by supporting each other and making the ‘system’ face their abuses, acknowledge your pain and re-write history in an accurate manner lest we forget the atrocities perpetrated 😦

    Like

  3. Autumn Cote says:

    Would it be OK if I cross-posted this article to WriterBeat.com? There is no fee; I’m simply trying to add more content divrersity for our community and I enjoyed reading your work. I’ll be sure to give you complete credit as the author. If “OK” please let me know via email.

    Autumn
    AutumnCote@WriterBeat.com

    Like

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