Terminal Hope; Not Homelessness

On December 31st, I wrote about hopeful expectation for the newest decade. I’d said I felt sizable hope but tempered with the need to tread carefully for a while. That thought was focused on the large-scale issues surrounding us: things like Indigenous treaty, territorial and sovereign rights; climate change; alternative energy fights; the lack of decency in all political governance and so on.

By January 1st, it was clear any trepidation about those big issues was not going to match the colossal wrecking ball coming much closer to home.

Today, I beg you to read my words to the end.

My last previous post was a small tribute to my beautiful, 22 yr. old. nephew who’d become a victim of the opioid crisis on New Year’s Day. Twenty days after that, we got devastating news about my sister.

Tragedies happen every day to families and as a family with solid membership in that pool, there are many days I wonder how we manage to keep going at all. But this takes me back to that sense of hope I’d mentioned. Maybe it’s something not fathomable at all. I don’t know what to make of it, but maybe what emerges from that hope is a greater good. I have no idea what that looks like either, but my heart is saying, hold on and do what you can. Do it with all the love you’ve got and wait. Apparently, that’s all I get to know. I’ll live with that; because we all do. That’s all we’ve got.

The rest of this post is the wording I’ve used for her fundraising campaign. Living in the U.S with little health insurance means this is what we get to do and in the very act itself, it’s clear this is something we have to do. I hope you’ll read this small part of her story, and I hope you will help in sharing it.

Hiy hiy,

RL

She was always fiercely independent and she’s still on her own with her youngest son, 14 yrs. old, but this is a fight no one can do on their own.

She lives in Arizona, where the beauty of its big sky and desert landscapes drew her years ago. She had a great job. She had a great apartment and a great car, but what does that matter when a tumor pushes your brain toward the other side of your skull and you no longer think with a healthy logic?  

She’d inexplicably quit her job, which canceled her health insurance and benefits. She couldn’t remember why, nor when she’d last paid bills or even if. She didn’t know how to feel. As in, how to react to what was happening around her. She still made sure her boy got to school and had food on the table though.  Carrying on was always the order; until he came home from school one day and found her laying on her bedroom floor, dis-ordered. She was unable to stand or speak properly, making only nonsensical short sentences.

Within 48 hours of that shocking discovery, on January 22, my sister received a diagnosis of a glioblastoma tumor, in phase 4. That’s her scan in the opening image; it’s clear where the tumor is. It’s very aggressive, incurable cancer. She couldn’t and still can’t, remember the entire 3 months prior. They removed 99% of the tumor, but it’ll never stop growing. We learned on February 20th that surgery bought her 12-16 more weeks without treatment, of which 4 weeks had already been taken. They said she could have up to 18 months with treatment. She begins those treatments on February 27th.

Terminal cancer patients should have time to prepare with their children for the inevitability. The dying should have peace to make proper, or frankly any, arrangements. They should be able wrap their arms around their family and talk about their love for one another and even, if blessed, have time to close wounds created within the damages of life.

$25,000 is to cover what we can for an estimated period of 6 – 12 months. This is the minimum calculated to supplement the assistance we’ve applied for including insurance premium funding. This is for rent, food, medications and seemingly endless unexpected/unknown incidentals. She will have to move by March 31, 2020 if we don’t have the rent for April 1st. Please help us get that rent, and God-willing for any months she has left after that.

This will give her time; precious, precious minutes, to work out what she can, to make whatever arrangements are necessary, especially for her kids. We just want to give her some peace and a few more months of hugs. We just want to help. We just want to show her our love, before she says goodbye. A lifetime for $25,000.

$5, $10, $20, whatever number, helps. Thank you, for any and every cent that comes her way.  Cancer societies around the world always say every cent counts, and it does. It really, really does.

Click here to go to the fundraising account for Reva. With deep gratitude please help if you can, and share either way.

15 thoughts on “Terminal Hope; Not Homelessness

  1. ouch… I can’t “like” this post … it’s not the news anyone needs.

    Have you tried negotiating with her health insurance company now there is proof of why she was irrational? Surely if she was a paid member for years they will allow catch up …

    Pray you get every dollar needed to get you all there, so heart wrenching on top of losing her son.

    Like

  2. Dear Robyn, may your sense of hope be a messenger of the compassion, love and generosity that will come your and your sisters way..
    ..come from the wellspring of this site, from those it has touched so beautifully over the years and from the wider world of folks you have graced with your wonderful blog for justice.
    You are right beside me in my thoughts and I send you a big warm, virtual bear hug. I wish you, your sister and all of you, the best that can be.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Klaus. It’s so crucial to know we’re supported and that people care. It’s utterly gut-wrenching to feel alone in these battles; so thank you so much for your hand and heart. xo

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  3. I am so sorry for your family’s heartache, Kindred. Have you contacted churches near where she lives? Or even the counselors at her son’s school? They may have insight as to local programs that can assist with cash and other needs. Have you contacted the landlord directly as well as the electric company, etc.? Sometimes a utility company has a program for people who are ill and can often also point you toward a city or county facility that may be able to provide assistance. *HUGS* to you and yours! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey Kindred, thank you and yes, we’ve contacted major foundations and local community groups in addition to the labyrinth of government assistance. I did not know that about utility co.s though. Will look into that too. Thanks so much. xo

      Like

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